Posts Tagged ‘Tennessee’

wilson

By ThinkGoat

Memphis, Tennessee  Really? It’s Crime Crawlers. I’m not going to waste my precious time on some idiot who decides to risk life and limb on some sharp-assed metal only to get a few bucks in his pocket for groceries, tuition, whores, drugs, or a 40 oz. This story stood out because of something that prompted this quick-thinking dialog: “I’m like, man, what the hell you got going on, bro? He said something like he didn’t mean to kill him. I said, kill who brother? I don’t want to know who that is, I don’t want to know. You don’t got to tell me.”
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By Lazlo

Lake Wylie, South Carolina Social Networking was a different concept when I was a young man. It consisted of cruising around in cars between two or three different parking lots, and hanging out with the groups assembled there. From McDonald’s, to the Square, to the park, and back again in a big circle. The goal was to find out what was happening tonight, and hear all the gossip about what happened last night. Kid’s stuff. We didn’t realize how good we had it. We could chat about events, come and go, and never leave a lasting trail.

My, how things have changed. My dumbass perpetrator of the day is a young man who uses the current digital equivalent of cruising – Facebook. And although my wild-oats exploits may not have been available to as vast an audience as I might have wished, they weren’t available for the cops either.

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By Lazlo

Portland, Tennessee When I was a child, the teachers were almost gods. Outside of my parents, they were the intellectual, moral, and ethical compass in my life. There was no question about their integrity, and the things they said were unquestionably facts. The were beyond human – they were teachers.

As I grew older, attained some higher education myself and had children of my own, I came to understand that teachers were people, just like me. They were fraught with the same kinds of foibles and problems. But I still held them high esteem. I tended to regard them as special individuals that were called to serve – that had a drive to bring to our children the tools they would need to live life a in successful, fulfilling way. Little did I realize the tools some teachers would dispense – Ninja attack skills for the purpose of vindication. But that’s precisely the lesson Brenda Sue Rawls was passing on to her 7th grade apprentice. (more…)